Tuesday, 28 May 2024

Running Based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST)

Running

The Running Based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) is a powerful tool for measuring anaerobic power during running. Developed at the University of Wolverhampton in the UK, this test involves six sprints over 35 meters with a 10-second recovery between each sprint. It provides measurements of peak power, average power, minimum power, and a fatigue index.

Purpose of the RAST Test

The main purpose of the RAST test is to assess anaerobic power specifically related to running. By conducting this test, athletes and trainers can evaluate their performance and make informed decisions about their training routines.

Equipment Required

To conduct the RAST test, you will need the following equipment:

  • Scales
  • Stopwatch
  • Timing gates (optional)
  • Measuring tape
  • Marker cones
  • At least a 50-meter track

RAST Test Procedure

  1. Prior to the test, explain the procedures to the participant and ensure they understand. Perform a screening for health risks and obtain informed consent.
  2. Prepare the necessary forms and record basic participant information such as age, height, body weight, gender, and test conditions.
  3. Measure and mark out the 35-meter running track. Set up cones at each end of the track.
  4. It is recommended to have two testers for this test. One person will time each 35-meter sprint, while the other will time the 10-second recovery period.
  5. The participant stands at one end of the track and starts a maximal sprint on the command “go”. Ensure that the participant sprints at maximum effort through the finish line each time.
  6. After each sprint, there should be a 10-second recovery period. The next sprint starts from the opposite end of the track.
  7. Repeat this procedure until six sprints are completed.
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Scoring of the RAST Test

For accurate scoring of the RAST test, record the time taken for each sprint to the nearest hundredth of a second. If available, using timing gates can provide greater accuracy. These sprint times, along with body weight, can be used to calculate maximal, minimal, and average power outputs, as well as a fatigue index.

Calculations for Power Output

Use the following formula to calculate the power for each sprint:

Power = Weight × Distance ² ÷ Time ³

From these values, you can determine the maximum power, minimum power, average power, relative power, and fatigue index.

  • Peak Power: The highest power measurement.
  • Relative Peak Power: Peak power divided by body weight.
  • Average Power: The sum of all six power values divided by six.
  • Fatigue Index: (Maximum power – minimum power) divided by the total time for the six sprints.

Target Population for the RAST Test

The RAST test is suitable for individuals participating in multi-sprint sports such as basketball, football, hockey, rugby, and soccer. It provides valuable insights into an athlete’s anaerobic power, which is crucial in these sports.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. What is the purpose of the RAST test?
    The RAST test is designed to assess anaerobic power during running. It helps athletes and trainers evaluate performance and make informed decisions about training routines.

  2. What equipment is required for the RAST test?
    To conduct the RAST test, you will need scales, a stopwatch, timing gates (optional), a measuring tape, marker cones, and at least a 50-meter track.

  3. How is the RAST test scored?
    The RAST test is scored by recording the time taken for each sprint. These times, along with body weight, are used to calculate various power output measurements such as peak power, average power, and fatigue index.

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Conclusion

The Running Based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) is a valuable tool for measuring anaerobic power during running. By conducting this test, athletes and trainers can gain insights into their performance and make informed decisions about their training routines. With a focus on accuracy and reliable calculations, the RAST test provides valuable information for individuals involved in multi-sprint sports.

For more information about the RAST test and other fitness-related topics, visit Auralpressure.


References:

  • Draper, N. and Whyte, G (1997) Here’s a new running based test of anaerobic performance for which you need only a stopwatch and a calculator. Peak Performance, 97, p. 3-5
  • Zacharogiannis, E., Paradisis, G., and Tziortzis, S. (2004) An evaluation of tests of anaerobic power and capacity. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 36 (suppl. 5), S116.