Saturday, 13 Jul 2024

Rogers Physical Fitness Index

The Rogers Physical Fitness Index is a comprehensive fitness assessment developed by Frederick Rand Rogers in the 1920s. This index aimed to create a single fitness measurement based on scores from various fitness tests. It is important to note that although the Rogers Physical Fitness Index has historical significance, it is not recommended for current use.

Equipment Required

The testing equipment required for the Rogers Physical Fitness Index includes a grip dynamometer, leg and back dynamometer, lung spirometer, horizontal and parallel bars.

Test Components

The Rogers Physical Fitness Index comprises seven test items. Six of these items assess the strength of large muscle groups, while the seventh item, the spirometer test, measures lung vital capacity. Additionally, age, height, and weight are recorded for each subject before testing. The battery of tests is administered in the following order:

  1. Lung Capacity
  2. Grip Strength (left hand)
  3. Grip Strength (right hand)
  4. Back Lift
  5. Leg Lift
  6. Chin Ups
  7. Dips

Calculations

The Rogers Strength Index is calculated by adding arm strength (calculated using chin-up and dips results) to the right grip, left grip, back strength, leg strength, and lung capacity. The Rogers Physical Fitness Index is then determined by dividing the achieved Strength Index by the norm based on strength for a given age, weight, and sex.

References

  1. Rogers, Frederick Rand, (1925) Physical Capacity Tests in the Administration of Physical Education. Teachers College Contributions to Education, No. 173. New York: Teachers College, Columbia University, 1925
  2. Rogers, Frederick Rd, Tests and Measurement Programs in the Redirection of Physical Education (Bureau of Publications. New York: Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927), 16-17.
  3. Rogers, F. R. Physical Capacity Tests (New York: A. S. Barnes and Co., 1931), 9-27.
  4. Rogers, Frederick Rand. Fundamental Administrative Measures in Physical Education. Newton, Mass.: Pleiades Co., 1932.
  5. Cozens, Frederick W. (1940) Strength Tests as Measures of General Athletic Ability in College Men, Research Quarterly. American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, 11:1, 45-52.
  6. Allen, Gordon L., (1940) A comparative study of the Rogers Strength Index and the Springfield Muscular Efficiency Index, Springfield College Thesis.
  7. Wahrer, John William. (1957) Rogers Physical Fitness Index Test As A Measure Of Body Conditioning At Parsons College. Thesis for Degree Master of Science in Education, Drake University.
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Related Pages

  • Other examples of a single fitness index
  • McCloy Physical Fitness Test — an adaptation of the Rogers Index.
  • About the pioneer in sports science, Dudley A. Sargent

FAQs

Q: Is the Rogers Physical Fitness Index still recommended for use today?
A: No, the Rogers Physical Fitness Index is not recommended for current use. It holds historical significance in the development of fitness assessments.

Q: What equipment is required for the Rogers Physical Fitness Index?
A: The testing equipment required includes a grip dynamometer, leg and back dynamometer, lung spirometer, horizontal and parallel bars.

Q: How is the Rogers Strength Index calculated?
A: The Rogers Strength Index is calculated by adding arm strength (calculated using chin-up and dips results) to the right grip, left grip, back strength, leg strength, and lung capacity.

Q: What are the components of the Rogers Physical Fitness Index?
A: The Rogers Physical Fitness Index consists of seven test items: lung capacity, grip strength (left hand), grip strength (right hand), back lift, leg lift, chin-ups, and dips.

Summary

The Rogers Physical Fitness Index, developed by Frederick Rand Rogers in the 1920s, aimed to create a comprehensive fitness assessment based on scores from various tests. Although it is not recommended for current use, the index holds historical significance in the field of physical education and sports science. The assessment requires specific testing equipment and evaluates strength and lung capacity. The calculations involve measuring arm strength and determining the Rogers Strength Index and the Rogers Physical Fitness Index. By understanding the origins and components of the Rogers Physical Fitness Index, individuals can gain insights into the development of fitness assessments and their role in physical education.

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