Tuesday, 28 May 2024

Phosphate Recovery Test

The Phosphate Recovery Test is a valuable anaerobic fitness assessment that measures an individual’s ability to recover between sprints and produce consistent power levels. This test involves seven intense sprints, each lasting seven seconds, with a 23-second recovery period in between.

Purpose

The purpose of the Phosphate Recovery Test is to evaluate anaerobic capacity and determine an individual’s capability to recover between sprints while maintaining the same level of power throughout.

Equipment Required

To conduct this test, you will need a stopwatch, measuring tape, marker cones, and a track that is at least 60 meters in length.

Test Layout

Marker cones are positioned two meters apart for the first 20 meters. At the 40-meter mark, additional cones are placed two meters apart, extending to 60 meters. This layout sets the course for the test.

Procedure

Participants start at the first cone (Start 1) and sprint at maximum effort for seven seconds upon the command “go.” Observers note the cone the participants pass at the seven-second mark. After the sprint, participants have a 23-second recovery period before the next sprint. For the second sprint, participants position themselves at the last cone (Start 2), facing back along the cones. They sprint again for seven seconds in the opposite direction 30 seconds after the start of their first sprint. This process is repeated for a total of seven sprints.

Tham Khảo Thêm:  PFT Sit-Up Test (Crunches)

Scoring

The drop-off distance is determined by subtracting the distance covered in the last sprint from the distance covered in the first sprint. It is expected that the last sprint will cover a shorter distance due to fatigue.

Target Population

The Phosphate Recovery Test is suitable for athletes involved in multi-sprint sports such as basketball, hockey, rugby, soccer, and AFL.

References

  • Dawson, B., Ackland, T., Roberts, C., & Lawrence, S. (1991). Repeated effort testing: The phosphate recovery test revisited. Sports Coach, 14(2), 12-17.

  • Dawson, B., Ackland, T., Roberts, C., & Kirby, R.F. (1991). Phosphate Recovery Test [Power Test of the Legs/Lower Body – Running Test]. In Kirby’s guide to fitness and motor performance tests (pp. 370-371). BenOak Pub. Co. Cape Girardeau, MO.

Similar Tests

  • Sprint Recovery Test: Specifically designed for AFL players, involving 6 x 30m sprints.

  • Sprint Fatigue Test: Involves 10 x 30m sprints.

  • FIFA Interval Test 1: Consists of 6 x 40m sprints with 1 minute of recovery between each sprint.

  • Repeat Sprint Ability Test: Requires participants to complete 10 x 20m sprints, starting every 20 seconds.

  • RAST (Running Anaerobic Sprint Test): Involves 6 x 35m sprints.

  • Cycling Repeat Sprint Test: A cycling-based anaerobic capacity test that includes 5 x 6-second efforts every 30 seconds.

Related Pages

  • Warming up for sprint testing.

  • Testing for intermittent sports.

  • Other anaerobic tests.

FAQs

Q: What does the Phosphate Recovery Test measure?
A: The Phosphate Recovery Test assesses an individual’s ability to recover between sprints and maintain consistent power levels.

Q: What equipment is required for the Phosphate Recovery Test?
A: To conduct this test, you will need a stopwatch, measuring tape, marker cones, and a track that is at least 60 meters long.

Tham Khảo Thêm:  Roller Skating

Q: Who is the target population for the Phosphate Recovery Test?
A: This test is suitable for athletes involved in multi-sprint sports such as basketball, hockey, rugby, soccer, and AFL.

Summary

The Phosphate Recovery Test is an anaerobic fitness assessment that evaluates an individual’s capacity to recover between sprints while maintaining consistent power levels. By conducting this test, athletes can gain valuable insights into their anaerobic capacity and identify areas for improvement. With its straightforward procedure and target population, the Phosphate Recovery Test is a valuable tool for athletes and coaches alike. To optimize athletic performance and track progress, incorporating this test into training regimens can prove beneficial.