Tuesday, 28 May 2024

Interval Shuttle Run Test (ISRT)

The Interval Shuttle Run Test (ISRT) is a fitness test designed to assess the ability to recover and repeat intermittent activity. Developed by Lemmink et al. in 2000, this test is commonly used for team sport players and athletes involved in intermittent sports.

Purpose

The purpose of the Interval Shuttle Run Test is to evaluate an individual’s capacity to engage in intermittent activity and effectively recover between intervals.

Equipment required

To conduct the test, you will need a clear flat area that is at least 20m long, an audio recording of the test, and marker cones.

Test Layout

The test layout requires marking out a 20m area with markers at either end. Additionally, place markers 3 meters before each end line to create tolerance zones.

Test Procedure

The test involves running for 30 seconds alternated with 15 seconds of walking. Participants start running on the first “beep” and aim to reach the opposite end by the next “beep.” This cycle continues until a double beep indicates the end of the 30-second period. Participants then walk forward to the next line and wait for the start of the next level in 15 seconds.

The running speed starts at 10 km/hr and increases by 1 km/hr every 90 seconds. Once the running speed reaches 13 km/hr, the increase in speed is reduced to 0.5 km/hr. The test concludes when the athlete fails to make it into the tolerance zone twice.

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Scoring

The test score is determined by the number of fully completed 20-meter runs.

Advantages

The Interval Shuttle Run Test is particularly relevant for sports that involve intermittent activity, making it more suitable than the commonly used beep test.

Disadvantages

One of the main drawbacks of this test is the lack of normative values due to its less common usage. Additionally, creating or obtaining the necessary audio recording can be challenging.

Similar Tests

  • 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15 IFT): This test also alternates between 30 seconds of running and 15 seconds of walking but over a 40m course.
  • Gacon Test: An intermittent test that involves 45 seconds of running and 15 seconds of rest, with the running distance incrementally increasing.
  • Yo-Yo Intermittent Tests: This test incorporates a short active break (5 and 10 seconds) after every 2 x 20m shuttle.
  • Futsal Intermittent Endurance Test: Consisting of 45m (3x15m) shuttles performed at progressive speeds until exhaustion.
  • Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test: Originally designed for testing soccer players.

References

  • Lemmink, K.A.P.M., G. Dolleman, R. Verheijen, and C. Visscher. Betrouwbaarheid en discriminerend vermogen van twee nieuwe voetbaltests [Interval sprint test en interval shuttle run test]. Geneeskunde Sport 33(3):39-48. 2000.
  • Lemmink, K.A.P.M., R. Verheijen, and C. Visscher. The discriminative power of the Interval Shuttle Run Test and the Maximal Multistage Shuttle Run Test for playing level of soccer. J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness. in press 2004.
  • Lemmink, K.A.P.M., and C. Visscher. The relationship between the Interval Shuttle Run Test and the maximal oxygen uptake in soccer players. J. Hum. Movement Stud. 45:219-232. 2003.
  • Lemmink KA, Visscher C, Lambert MI, Lamberts RP. The interval shuttle run test for intermittent sport players: evaluation of reliability. J Strength Cond Res. 2004 Nov;18(4):821-7.
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FAQs

Q: Who is the Interval Shuttle Run Test suitable for?
A: The Interval Shuttle Run Test was developed for team sport players and athletes engaged in sports that require intermittent activity.

Q: What is the purpose of the Interval Shuttle Run Test?
A: The test aims to assess an individual’s ability to recover and repeat intermittent activity.

Q: How is the Interval Shuttle Run Test scored?
A: The test score is determined by the number of fully completed 20-meter runs.

Summary

The Interval Shuttle Run Test (ISRT) is an intermittent fitness test developed by Lemmink et al. to evaluate an individual’s ability to recover and repeat intermittent activity. It involves running for 30 seconds alternated with 15 seconds of walking. The test starts at a running speed of 10 km/hr and increases by 1 km/hr every 90 seconds until reaching 13 km/hr, after which the speed increases by 0.5 km/hr. The number of fully completed 20-meter runs determines the test score. The ISRT is particularly relevant for sports involving intermittent activity. Alternative tests include the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test, Gacon Test, Yo-Yo Intermittent Tests, Futsal Intermittent Endurance Test, and Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test. It is important to consult the provided references for further details and reliable information. To improve fitness, consider incorporating the Interval Shuttle Run Test into your training routine.