Sunday, 21 Jul 2024

In-Water Vertical Jump

The in-water vertical jump test is a variation of the standing vertical jump, specifically designed for water polo players. This test measures the player’s ability to push up and reach as high as possible above the water level while treading water.

Equipment Required

To conduct the in-water vertical jump test, you will need a modified Vertec® or a similar device.

Pre-Test

Before conducting the test, explain the procedures to the participant and ensure they understand the test requirements. It’s important to perform a screening for health risks, obtain informed consent, and record basic information such as age, height, body weight, and gender. Additionally, a proper warm-up should be performed. For more detailed pre-test procedures, refer to our guidelines.

Test Procedure

The measurement device for jump height should be set up beside the pool, ensuring the water level is such that the participants are unable to touch the bottom. Calibrate the equipment to measure the height reached above the water level. Starting from a position of treading water, the player pushes up and reaches as high as possible above the water. Allow several attempts with proper rest between each one. To calculate the relative jump height, you also need to measure the player’s upper body length from the hip to the tip of the finger with the arm fully extended overhead.

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Scoring

Several measurements can be made during the test. One option is to calculate the absolute jump height, which represents the height reached above the water level. However, this measurement does not account for differences in body length. Another option is to calculate a relative jump value, which is a percentage score relative to the player’s upper body length. The formula for calculating the relative jump score is as follows:

Relative Jump Score (%) = (Absolute Jump Height / Hip to Finger Tip) x 100

A score of 100% indicates that the player’s hips just reached the surface of the water. A score below 100% means the hips were below the water, while a score above 100% indicates the hips were above the surface of the water.

Results

In a study conducted by Tan et al. (2009) on Australian National squad players, the average jump height was found to be 139cm, with a relative jump score of 102%. Platanou (2005) conducted a study on Greek water polo players and found an average jump height of 68.3 +/- 4.6 cm. In another study carried out on Greek premier league players in 2006, Platanou measured an average jump height of 68.6 +/- 5.4 cm, with a range of 56.5-79.5 cm.

References

  • Platanou, T. (2005). On water and dry land vertical jump in water polo players. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 45(1), 26-31.
  • Platanou T. Simple ‘In-Water’ Vertical Jump Testing in Water Polo. Kinesiology, 38(2006), 1:57-62.
  • Tan F.H., Polglaze T., Dawson B., Cox G. Anthropometric and fitness characteristics of elite Australian female water polo players. J Strength Cond Res, 23(5), 1530-1536, 2009.
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FAQs

Q: What is the in-water vertical jump test?
A: The in-water vertical jump test is a variation of the standing vertical jump, specifically designed for water polo players. It measures the player’s ability to push up and reach as high as possible above the water level while treading water.

Q: How is the in-water vertical jump test performed?
A: The test requires a modified Vertec® or a similar device to measure the jump height. Participants start from a position of treading water and push up, reaching as high as they can above the water. Several attempts are allowed with adequate rest between each one.

Q: How is the jump height measured in the in-water vertical jump test?
A: The jump height is measured using a device set up beside the pool. The water level should be such that participants cannot touch the bottom. The equipment is calibrated to measure the height reached above the water level. To calculate the relative jump height, the player’s upper body length from the hip to the tip of the finger is also measured with the arm fully extended overhead.

Q: What does the relative jump score indicate?
A: The relative jump score is a percentage score relative to the player’s upper body length. A score of 100% means the player’s hips just reached the surface of the water. A score below 100% indicates the hips were below the water, while a score above 100% means the hips were above the surface of the water.

Conclusion

The in-water vertical jump test is a valuable tool for assessing the jumping ability of water polo players. By measuring their ability to push up and reach as high as possible above the water level, this test provides valuable insights into their power and explosiveness in the pool. Conducting this test with precision and following the proper procedures will ensure accurate and reliable results for coaches and athletes alike. To learn more about the in-water vertical jump test and other related topics, visit the Auralpressure website.

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