Tuesday, 18 Jun 2024

10m Shuttle Test

The 10m shuttle test is an aerobic fitness test specifically designed for children with cerebral palsy (CP). It is meant for those classified at Level I or Level II on the Gross Motor Function Classification System. Researchers at the Rehabilitation Centre De Hoogstraat in Utrecht, The Netherlands described this test in 2006. This variation of the 20m beep test also has a wheelchair version for individuals with CP. Additionally, there is a similar test called the 10m Incremental Shuttle Walk Test for people with COPD.

Test Details

  • Equipment Required: Flat, non-slip surface, marking cones, 10m measuring tape, heart rate monitor, pre-recorded CD (created using the team beep test software).
  • Pre-test: Explanation of test procedures, screening of health risks, and obtaining informed consent.
  • Test Layout: Cones placed 10 meters apart with tape marking the end points.
  • Procedure: Participants wear regular sports clothing and shoes, and orthoses if applicable. They walk or run between the two markers at incremental speeds in time with the pre-recorded CD. The test continues until the subject is unable to keep in sync with the recording.
  • Variations: Separate protocols exist for children at each CP GMFCS level (SRT-1 and SRT-2). The Level I shuttle run test (SRT-I) starts at 5 km/h and is for children classified at GMFCS Level 1. The Level II shuttle run test (SRT-II) starts at 2 km/h and is for children classified at GMFCS Level 2. The speed increases by 0.25 km/h every level (minute) for both tests.
Tham Khảo Thêm:  Pushball

Scoring and Target Population

The athlete’s score is determined by the level and number of shuttles (10m) reached before they were unable to keep up with the recording. This test is specifically targeted towards children with cerebral palsy (CP).

Reliability and Validity

The test has good test-retest reliability for exercise time and reliability for peak heart rate attained during the final level. High correlations have been found between data for both shuttle run tests and data for the treadmill test.

Advantages and Disadvantages

  • Advantages: The standard 20m beep test may not be suitable for many children, especially those with disabilities, as the starting speed and increase every minute may be beyond their capabilities. The 10m shuttle test provides a better alternative for testing aerobic capacity in children with CP.
  • Disadvantages: As with all beep-type tests, practice and motivation levels can influence the score attained, and the scoring can be subjective.

FAQs

Q: Who is the 10m shuttle test for?
A: The 10m shuttle test is specifically designed for children with cerebral palsy (CP) classified at Level I or Level II on the Gross Motor Function Classification System.

Q: What equipment is required for the 10m shuttle test?
A: The equipment required includes a flat, non-slip surface, marking cones, 10m measuring tape, a heart rate monitor, and a pre-recorded CD (which can be created using the team beep test software).

Q: How is the 10m shuttle test scored?
A: The athlete’s score is determined by the level and number of shuttles (10m) reached before they were unable to keep up with the recording.

Tham Khảo Thêm:  Arm Wrestling: The Ultimate Test of Strength and Skill

Summary

The 10m shuttle test is an aerobic fitness test designed for children with cerebral palsy (CP) classified at Level I or Level II. It provides a suitable alternative to the standard 20m beep test for testing aerobic capacity in children with CP. The test layout and procedure are straightforward, and there are separate protocols for different CP GMFCS levels. The test has good reliability and validity, making it a valuable tool in assessing aerobic endurance in this population.